DQ#2 According to Lichtman (2011), “The Federal Government requires each nursing home facility to have a governing body, or designated persons functioning as a governing body”

DQ#2 According to Lichtman (2011), “The Federal Government requires each nursing home facility to have a governing body, or designated persons functioning as a governing body” (para. 1). The governing body of a nursing home setting may be referred to as the board of directors, board of trustees, or “the board” (Singh, 2016, p. 332). Although it is necessary for both the board and the nursing home administrator (NHA) to have a good working relationship, they both serve their purpose for different responsibilities, and if there is lack of communication from either side, organizational functions, care quality, and employee morale will suffer as a result. The board functions include appointing a NHA, reviewing his or her performance, assisting the NHA in establishing goals and objectives that are in-line with the organization’s mission and vision, ensuring facility’s compliance, and establishing guidelines and support for the NHA, as well as policies to protect patient rights (Singh, 2016, p. 333). According to Singh (2016), “The NHA acts as the agent of the board and is responsible for the day-to-day management of the nursing facility” (p. 334). In other words, the NHA manages the business, employees, and represents the organization in the community. Because the board depends on the NHA to carry out tasks, and the NHA depends on the board for support and guidance, it is critical for the relationship to be positive with good interaction and communication.

References:

Lichtman, A., Ostreicher, A. (2011). The Governing Body: What is its role and who should Fill the Position? RYTES Company. Retrieved from RYTEScompany.com

Singh, D.A. (2016). Effective Management of Long-Term Care Facilities. (3rd. ed). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

 

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