Modern scientific nomenclature

Modern scientific nomenclature

Modern scientific nomenclature really began with Linnaeus in botany1, but other disciplines2,3 were not many years behind in developing various systems4-7 for nomenclature and symbolization.

Then prepare a bibliography listing the sources for the numbered citations in the same order.
2) Name –year method. This method lists the source of information at the point of each citation. The author(s)* and the date (year), offset in parentheses or brackets, follow immediately after the cited information .

Example: By contrast, the several antisera that have been raised against Sp1, a defined RNA polymerase II transcription factor (Kadonaga 1986), stain exclusively the nucleus . . .
For different numbers of Authors:
One author: (Field 2005)
Two authors: (Gass and Varonis 1984)
More than two authors: (Munro et al. 2006)

No author: If the author cannot be determined use the article title (for long titles use the first few words followed by …):
Top fields of study for international students are business and engineering, followed by physical and life sciences, math and computer science, and social sciences (Open Doors 2010).
No date: For online sources if the publication year cannot be determined use the year of access. For print sources use [date unknown]:(Smith [date unknown])

Bibliographical citations are ordered alphabetically by the first author’s last names.

Citations in the bibliography listed at the end of the paper are done as follows:

Books:
C-S : Author(s), chapter title, source (book title), editors (if any), publisher, city, , date and pages.

Example: Sherman, C. The invisible Web : uncovering information sources search engines can’t see. Medford, N.J.: CyberAge Books, Information Today; 2001. 439 p.

N-Y: Author(s..), date, chapter title, source (book title), editors (if any), publisher, city, and pages.
Example: Sherman, C. 2001. The invisible Web : uncovering information sources search engines can’t see. Medford, N.J.: CyberAge Books, Information Today; 439 p.
Periodical (Journal) articles:
C-S: Author(s), article title, source (periodical name), volume, pages and date.

Example: Cox J, Engstrom RT. Influence of the spatial pattern of conserved lands on the persistence of a large population of red-cockaded woodpeckers. Biol Conserv. 2001; 100(1): 137-150.
N-Y: Author(s), date, article title, source (periodical name), volume, and pages.

Example: Cox J, Engstrom RT. 2001. Influence of the spatial pattern of conserved lands on the persistence of a large population of red-cockaded woodpeckers. Biol Conserv. 100(1): 137-150.
Online Articles:

C-S Example: Savage E, Ramsay M, White J, Beard S, Lawson H, Hunjan R, Brown D. Mumps outbreaks across England and Wales in 2004: observational study. BMJ [Internet]. 2005 [cited 2007 May 31]; 330(7500):1119-1120. Available from: http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/reprint/330/7500/1119 doi:10.1136/bmj.330.7500.119

N-Y Example: Savage E, Ramsay M, White J, Beard S, Lawson H, Hunjan R, Brown D. 2005. Mumps outbreaks across England and Wales in 2004: observational study. BMJ [Internet]. [cited 2007 May 31]; 330(7500):1119-1120. Available from: http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/reprint/330/7500/1119 doi:10.1136/bmj.330.7500.119

Website:
?Include: Title of web site, Place of publication and publisher, Date of publication and ?date of last update (if ?relevant),Date you accessed the information (date cited),URL ?(Web aIDress) of the site

C-S Example: APSnet: plant pathology online [Internet]. St Paul (MN): American Phytopathological Association: c1994-2005 [cited 2005 Jun 20]. Available from: http://www.apsnet.org/

N-Y Example: APSnet: plant pathology online [Internet]. c1994-2005. St Paul (MN): American Phytopathological Association: [cited 2005 Jun 20]. Available from: http://www.apsnet.org/

 

 

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